3 Ways to Come Up with Landscape/Lawn Care/Outdoor Living Blogging Topics

Are you running out of blog ideas?

If you’ve been following this blog for the past 18 months, you’ll be able to pick out some recurrent themes:

  1. The importance of beefing up your landscape/lawn care/outdoor living website with compelling content. And not just web copy (written words), but also videos, photos of before and after projects (with happy clients in them). And I’ve encouraged you to effectively use social media to build your green business’s platform and get the news out when you’ve something new online to share.
  2. The importance of localizing your website and blogging to gather interest among readers who’ll call you for business. My biggest push: Even though the Yellow Pages might’ve gone the way of the dodo bird, don’t forget about your geographical audience.
  3. The importance of keeping a consistent web and social media presence to garner trust and bring more people to you.

Yet, after you or your writer have been blogging awhile, you may find that your landscape/lawn care/outdoor living ideas are drying up. You’ve done everything I recommended, plus more. And the well is running dry.

So what do you do?

Here are three places to find new ideas to get the blogging ball rolling again:

  1. Look up keyword searches on Google Trends. How do people find your blogs? Ideally, if you’ve hired an Internet marketing agency that specializes in localization, they probably supply you with this information. If not, you need to do it yourself.
    I’m not an expert in Google Trends, but this is what I figured out by plugging in the keywords “build swimming pool:”
  • Under regions, I got this
    UnderRegion
  • Under queries, I got this
    UnderQ
  • Under rising, I got this
    UnderQ2

So now I have some keywords to work with even if my pretend pool business is not located in the top subregions. You can use “build a pool (which was the most popular keyword search);” “inground swimming pools;” “natural swimming pools.” Additionally, you can write about “cost of a swimming pool;” “swimming pool design;” and “building a pool.”

  1. Check out your blog’s statistics. What were your most popular blogs? Can you write more about those subtopics? What about comments? Use comments to write new blog content.
  2. Look at the junk mail that’s delivered to your home’s mailbox. Last week, I got a mailer from a big box store. They had three pamphlets labeled: “Welcome Home,” “Backyard Living,” and “Curb Appeal.” In the Curb Appeal pamphlet there were “Tips for Tender Loving Lawn Care.” Have you ever written a blog about giving your readers’ lawns TLC? Play around with it—just don’t copy someone else’s work because your Google rankings WILL drop and you could get in trouble for plagiarism (now I’m sounding like an English teacher!).

As you can see, you have a lot of options when it comes to digging for new blogging ideas.

Have you tried the above? Or if you have other techniques for finding fresh landscape/lawn care/outdoor living blog topics, please share them here!

Okay, so you decided to hire a writer to blog about you, your work, and your landscape and lawn care services. You’ve learned that hiring a marketing writer doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg.

Smooth sailing, right?

Well, don’t think that you’ve washed your hands from the project. You’re still the boss and you need to provide some direction to your marketing team, which includes that writer you recently hired.

Here are three things to expect from your freelance writer when she writes blog posts for you:

  1. Introductory questions: Most market-savvy writers will know to ask you specific questions about your blog goals. But if you hire a newbie writer, she may not know what questions she should be asking you:

Who is your ideal client?

What type of people do you serve (upper class, upper middle class, commercial, or just residential)

What climate and growing zone do your clients live in?

What’s your business’s cycle? For example, if I have a client in a temperate zone, say in Florida, then I need to know what their growing cycle is like since I’m from Pennsylvania.

What does your business do: hardscaping, landscaping, lawn care, or a combination of all three?

What makes your business stand out from the crowd?

How often do you want to publish your blog–once a month, biweekly, or weekly?

How often do you want to pay your writer? After each blog post, once a month, or on a quarterly basis?

And do you want Q&A- (Question and Answer), how to-, or informational blogs? Or a mixture of all three?

  1. The editorial calendar: You’re probably thinking, the editorial what? But the editorial calendar is essential for a streamlined relationship with your writer. And an editorial calendar doesn’t have to be formal. I have clients who want me to focus on a theme, like lawn diseases, for a couple of months and others who’ll give me general topics to focus on for one month. I’ll do some added research, if needed, and then, write the blog.
  2. Your feedback:It’s imperative that you look at the blog draft before it goes online. You should also feel that your copywriter is approachable to fixing any mistakes–including the grammatical and spelling ones. And a copywriter shouldn’t charge you for revisions–at least not for the first two revisions. After more than two revisions, you and your writer may need to work out communication kinks or decide to part ways.

Look, I know writing can be intimidating. Yet, you can feel comfortable that there are competent writers out there–including ones who specialize in the lawn care/landscape industries–who’ll write blogs for you at a reasonable rate.

Do you want to post a regular blog for your clients and prospects? Then call me at 717-381-6719 (EST) or email me at wendy@landscapewriter.com to collaborate on your landscape or lawn care blog.

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